Artist Spends 35 Years Decorating Her House With Rocks And A Glue Gun

Diply 19 Oct 2016

One of the first things most of us will do after buying a house is paint. We want to have our own colors on the walls to match our furniture and to make it feel more like our own and less like we're living in somebody else's old house. It's only natural.

But once we've settled into a house, most of us will get into a rut. We find just the right spot for the couch and the TV, get the bed set up and the bookshelves filled, and that's it. We don't want to move any of that stuff again if we don't absolutely have to. For Lauri Svedberg, however, her home was a constant work in progress. She didn't get stuck in a rut. She made her home into a unique work of art.

When Lauri Svedberg bought her northeast Minneapolis home in 1979, it was a smallish, unassuming one bedroom, one bathroom home.

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Built in 1912, from the outside her house has considerable curb appeal. It's not a cookie-cutter suburban McMansion by any means.

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Although the interior is the real showstopper, the home got its nickname, Wolf House, from a painting of a wolf Lauri did on the outside.  

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There are also a couple of wolf statues around the exterior.

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However, after Lauri purchased the property, she started putting her artistic skills to work, creating a home like nothing you've ever seen before.

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Seriously, if you've encountered a home like Lauri's before, you've been places.

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For many years, Lauri supplemented her teacher's salary with artwork she did on the side.

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There's even an addition of an octagonal studio where she would paint.

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Nearly every surface in Wolf House has been turned into a canvas, either for a painting or a mosaic of rocks and pebbles. 

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Clearly a nature lover, Lauri collected the stones herself and found places for them around her house.

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It all started when she needed to replace a window. 

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Being an old house, Lauri had difficulty finding glass that would fit into a frame, so she came up with her own solution: Mason jars framed with pebbles.

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It's impossible to imagine how many hours Lauri spent with a hot glue gun in her hand over her 35 years as the owner of Wolf House.

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Not only is considerable work on display, but it has been through a few transformations over the years, including an "outer space" room and an "urban" room. But in time, Lauri's love of nature took over.

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If you felt the call of nature when visiting Lauri, you would find yourself in a fittingly serene woodland setting.

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A waterfall with stones both real and painted on graces the staircase. 

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Note that the front of each step has stones as well.

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The trees Lauri painted on the walls match well with the real beams featured throughout Wolf House.

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And you can't say it doesn't get enough natural sunlight!

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The rooms upstairs continue the nature theme with an overwhelming use of stone on the walls and animal print fabrics.

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On the deck, there's a pond with a fountain that Lauri transformed from a "hippie hot tub."

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And she says the cobblestones around the yard came from old Minneapolis streets.

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You have to admire a bold approach, and Lauri certainly had that in her favor.

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After she retired, Lauri chose to sell Wolf House, and although the real estate agents weren't sure what to do with it, it eventually sold for $40,000 over asking.

Whether the new owners kept Lauri's hard work on display or renovated it for themselves remains unknown, but for a time, Wolf House had to be one of the more interesting houses around.

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